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Health Knowledge: Men and Women Have Different Heart Disease Symptoms

by Ernest Harry
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According to the American Heart Association (AHA), heart attack symptoms differ between men and women. Women are more likely than men to experience some symptoms similar to those of the flu or nausea. Therefore, if people feel unwell, they should seek medical attention as soon as possible.


Take blood pressure regularly to develop good healthy habits. (Photo via Pixabay.com)

Dallas, TX (Merxwire) – When the weather is cold, it is easy to cause vasoconstriction and blood pressure rise, indirectly leading to atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, or stroke. In addition to cardiovascular disease, patients and the elderly need to keep warm; women also need to be aware of flu-like heart disease symptoms.

Although heart attacks are sudden, most people start with mild pain or discomfort. The AHA noted that heart attack symptoms differ between men and women, and patients should seek medical attention as soon as possible if they feel unwell to avoid delays in treatment that can worsen their condition.

Symptoms of heart disease in women are not easy to identify, and some patients mistakenly think they have the flu! The AHA notes that women are more likely than men to experience some symptoms similar to those of the flu or nausea. They often attribute their symptoms to less life-threatening conditions or even take over-the-counter medicines themselves, but they should call 911.

Most heart attacks in both men and women include chest discomfort, difficulty breathing, and pain in the head, neck, arms, jaw, stomach, and back. These pains can occur in a single area or multiple areas. Women are more likely to experience shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, and back or jaw pain.

People should seek medical attention immediately if they feel unwell. (Photo via Pixabay.com)

“Although men and women can experience chest pressure that feels like an elephant sitting across the chest, women can experience a heart attack without chest pressure,” said Nieca Goldberg, M.D., medical director for the Joan H. Tisch Center for Women’s Health at NYU’s Langone Medical Center and an American Heart Association volunteer.

“Instead they may experience shortness of breath, pressure or pain in the lower chest or upper abdomen, dizziness, lightheadedness or fainting, upper back pressure or extreme fatigue.” Nieca Goldberg explained in the press release.

To reduce the risk of heart disease, people can prevent the disease by making changes in their daily lives, such as quitting smoking, quitting alcohol, getting the right amount of sleep, and adjusting their eating habits. According to the AHA research, eating two servings of fruits and three servings of vegetables a day is the dietary advice that helps reduce the risk of many diseases.

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