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Curling Suitable for All Ages to Play Together

by Julie Howard
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As early as 1980, curling was officially included in the team system of the Winter Olympic Games. It is a popular ice sport in European and American countries.


Curling is widely regarded as one of the oldest team sports in the world. (Photo via pexels.com)

Taipei, Taiwan (Merxwire) – The Chinese Taipei Men’s Team defeated the Kazakh team at the Curling Championship and won the bronze medal, getting the tickets for the World Championships Qualifying Tournament to be held in Finland in January next year. This competition came so suddenly that many people have never even heard of curling. Curling has not only been around since the 16th century, it is now a competition event for the Winter Olympics.

According to the Chinese Taipei Olympic Committee, curling, also known as “Ice Skating”, is a team-based Winter Olympic Games event. During the game, the athletes need to knock away the opponent’s stone pot and leave their team’s stone pot in the center of the field. Finally, score points based on the location of the final stop area. It is a sport that combines strategy, tactics, and comprehensive skills, and it pays great attention to the tacit understanding and cooperation between teams.

The formal curling competition requires a very flat, 44-meter-long, 4.32-meter-wide strip of ice. (Photo via unsplash.com)

Curling first appeared in Scotland in the 16th century. At that time, people would pile stone balls on frozen pond wetlands in winter. After the 17th century, adding a handle on top of the stone became the prototype of curling. And derived the competition system. Later, as the British army spread to North America, curling became more popular, and it was officially included in the formal event of the Winter Olympics in 1980.

The “stone pot” used in the competition is in the shape of a round ball and has a handle on it. It needs to be polished from mica-free granite. It has a diameter of 29 cm and a weight of about 19 kg. (Photo via pexels.com)

The formal curling competition requires a very flat, 44-meter-long, 4.32-meter-wide strip of ice. A circle with a diameter of 1.83 meters is drawn at both ends of the ice rink as the home base and the camp. During the game, the team that throws the curling closest to the center of the camp can score. Otherwise, the other team has no points. There are 10 rounds in the whole game, and the team with the highest total score of the 10 rounds is the winning team.

At present, there are not many curling venues in Taiwan, and there are no natural venues, but it does not affect the promotion of curling in Taiwan. Some industry players have introduced an improved version of the ground curling exercise, which removes the professional skills of skating on the ice, and unlike other ball sports, which have close physical contact and intense collisions, it is a milder type of exercise. Because it does not need to be on a real skating venue, it can be done directly on flat ground. The rules are simple and challenging. The elderly and children can have fun together. It is a sport that everyone can share in the fun.

Sports promotion in Taiwan is becoming more and more mature, and the benefits of sports are becoming more and more familiar to everyone. Not only can they improve physical fitness, but they can also cultivate concentration and frustration tolerance so that they can be psychologically happy and improve social interaction. According to the results of a survey of the 110-year exercise status released by the Sports Administration, Ministry of Education on the 24th, the Taiwanese people are paying more and more attention to their physical health and are trying to maintain good exercise habits. If you haven’t tried curling before, you might as well try it some time, maybe you will fall in love with it.

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